1. Moved to www.Quixatocs.com

    This site has moved to www.quixatocs.com

     

    2 years ago
  2. I know I’m always goddess-harping on about Zelda but here is a really good example of dynamic musical layering.
[Spoiler Alert]
In The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword the level design for the third temple centers around a timeshift mechanic where link can hit crystals that shift the immediate vicinity to a time where the Lanayru Mining Facility flourished. In the present time the land is a desert inhabited by crustaceans and the remains of the old mining robots. In the past it was a working industrial facility. When in the present the music has a much blander texture and is as arid and desolate as the desert for which this music is representing. When link moves into the area that is timeshifted the music takes on a much richer texture gaining new instruments and more details. 
Although this is not a new feature it is really done to the highest standard I have yet seen in a videogame. You can check out the musical differences ingame on any one of the links on this page:http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=lanayru+mine

    I know I’m always goddess-harping on about Zelda but here is a really good example of dynamic musical layering.

    [Spoiler Alert]

    In The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword the level design for the third temple centers around a timeshift mechanic where link can hit crystals that shift the immediate vicinity to a time where the Lanayru Mining Facility flourished. In the present time the land is a desert inhabited by crustaceans and the remains of the old mining robots. In the past it was a working industrial facility. 

    When in the present the music has a much blander texture and is as arid and desolate as the desert for which this music is representing. When link moves into the area that is timeshifted the music takes on a much richer texture gaining new instruments and more details. 

    Although this is not a new feature it is really done to the highest standard I have yet seen in a videogame. 

    You can check out the musical differences ingame on any one of the links on this page:
    http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=lanayru+mine

    2 years ago
  3. Osmos has been around for a little while but I only just managed to give it a good play (Yes, it is a slow day in the library). 

The game is a nice standard eat ‘em up taking place in an ambiant space-style pond. 

The game features a solid ambient soundtrack to match and with one particularly interesting dynamic feature: The player has the ability to slow the level of play down which makes every action take longer to complete and the competition life-forms move slower. With this the soundtrack is time-shifted to match the new speed of game. This musical immersion in a game mechanic designed to make the game easier (or harder) really makes the slower movement of play stand out.

    Osmos has been around for a little while but I only just managed to give it a good play (Yes, it is a slow day in the library). 



    The game is a nice standard eat ‘em up taking place in an ambiant space-style pond. 



    The game features a solid ambient soundtrack to match and with one particularly interesting dynamic feature: The player has the ability to slow the level of play down which makes every action take longer to complete and the competition life-forms move slower. With this the soundtrack is time-shifted to match the new speed of game. This musical immersion in a game mechanic designed to make the game easier (or harder) really makes the slower movement of play stand out.



    2 years ago


  4. Still on the Zelda high from Tuesday night’s concert I’ve been listening to the new Skyward Sword theme : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fN1vFESbfZk&feature=related but a chance bit of luck made me click on a reversed version of the track. As a child I used to be fascinated with reversing music in a sampler and would often listen to my favourite music backwards, so I did have a child-like curiosity for what this would sound like reversed.

    When I heard Zelda’s Lullaby coming out of my headphones I did a little geek scream and drew a decent amount of attention to myself in the library I was in. Oooops. 



    Who doesn’t love these nerdy moments though?



  5. 1st Generation | Quixatocs

    A generation from my, so far fledgling, generation program



  6. After the Zelda 25th Anniversary concert last night I can’t get enough of some of the OCRemixes. Here is a fun one. It’s quite simple in that its major change to the original is the bass and percussion lines but these additions really alter the style and mood of the piece.



    Do you have any remixes to share?



  7. 
Last night I went to the Legend of Zelda 25th Anniversary concert. 

I don’t think I’ve ever been to a video games concert with better production value that worked to my sometimes overly awkward classical ear. This was something else! The quality of the sound was phenomenal. I couldn’t believe that the sound engineer managed to mic up the full orchestra and still get them to sound balanced with such consistency throughout the performance. Nailed it! 

For those of you who didn’t manage to see the Tokyo, LA or London showing I’ll just say that the CD will be well worth the buy when it comes out. All I’m going to say about the music is the obvious: it brought up so many memories from my child(adult)hood that at times I was very moved. By far my favourite of the night was the Wind Waker Medley, so look out for it!

Another great feature of this night was the host, Zelda Williams. At most video-game concerts I’ve seen the host has usually been someone hired for their looks rather than for their knowledge about games. This girl knew her stuff!, and even admitted to being moved by the music as much as any other member of the audience there that night. She later posted on twitter that the London crowd were awesome, so well done team UK!

I must say that as a trained classical musician I’ve never ever ever seen a crowd get more behind, and emotionally involved in the music as I saw last night. So much cheering, so much applause, so much silence when the music required it! In fact, the sheer gravity of Koji Kondo himself coming out to play had the entire crowd holding their breath so as to let the master do his work. He commanded so much respect in that room that he literally could have played ‘chopsticks’ and everyone would have shut the hell up to hear it.

In closing the concert, they played us the new theme from skyward sword. Although I had the special edition ordered a while ago I almost felt like I should order another copy just to metaphorically kneel before the new heir to the throne, the king of all games series, The Legend of Zelda.

Were any of you there?



    Last night I went to the Legend of Zelda 25th Anniversary concert. 



    I don’t think I’ve ever been to a video games concert with better production value that worked to my sometimes overly awkward classical ear. This was something else! The quality of the sound was phenomenal. I couldn’t believe that the sound engineer managed to mic up the full orchestra and still get them to sound balanced with such consistency throughout the performance. Nailed it! 



    For those of you who didn’t manage to see the Tokyo, LA or London showing I’ll just say that the CD will be well worth the buy when it comes out. All I’m going to say about the music is the obvious: it brought up so many memories from my child(adult)hood that at times I was very moved. By far my favourite of the night was the Wind Waker Medley, so look out for it!



    Another great feature of this night was the host, Zelda Williams. At most video-game concerts I’ve seen the host has usually been someone hired for their looks rather than for their knowledge about games. This girl knew her stuff!, and even admitted to being moved by the music as much as any other member of the audience there that night. She later posted on twitter that the London crowd were awesome, so well done team UK!



    I must say that as a trained classical musician I’ve never ever ever seen a crowd get more behind, and emotionally involved in the music as I saw last night. So much cheering, so much applause, so much silence when the music required it! In fact, the sheer gravity of Koji Kondo himself coming out to play had the entire crowd holding their breath so as to let the master do his work. He commanded so much respect in that room that he literally could have played ‘chopsticks’ and everyone would have shut the hell up to hear it.



    In closing the concert, they played us the new theme from skyward sword. Although I had the special edition ordered a while ago I almost felt like I should order another copy just to metaphorically kneel before the new heir to the throne, the king of all games series, The Legend of Zelda.



    Were any of you there?



    2 years ago
  8. 
Cycling ‘74 Expo Day 3

Ben Houge, began my day with a workshop on prototyping video-game music in Max/MSP. Ben has worked on some serious industry leading games having worked for Ubisoft and Sierra among others. The workshop walked through issues and benefits of looping and layering music before moving to a slick audio-engine example from the early stages of design in Ubisoft’s EndWar. This patch had some amazingly simple processes: one such was gating a metronome pulse that could play a sound file at regular (or irregular) intervals. This created the illusion of a pulse. A second notable point about the patch was pooling different variations of guitar/drum/bass riffs that could be triggered in a random order to give a more acoustically genuine performance. 

The first person to write something with Max, Philippe D Manoury, spoke about various portions of his work and how they blended with Max. Some really interesting spectral examples where processing of live instruments were directly effected by Max and where FX were triggered by the instruments for Max to respond to. Of particular note was his string quartet, which, at points, produced bell-like sounds through the software.

Daito Manabe, however, ruled the world when he entered and showed all the projects he’d used Max on. The audience were in hysterics on watching this and the other descriptive videos: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VtRVvBSbonk&feature=relmfu

On reflection, my favourite things about the conference has been watching presenters patch live, thus letting us observe the thought processes and evolutions of patches as new features are imagined but I think the most amazing thing has been seeing how far this program can take projects and the infinite horizons that are available to its users.



    Cycling ‘74 Expo Day 3



    Ben Houge, began my day with a workshop on prototyping video-game music in Max/MSP. Ben has worked on some serious industry leading games having worked for Ubisoft and Sierra among others. The workshop walked through issues and benefits of looping and layering music before moving to a slick audio-engine example from the early stages of design in Ubisoft’s EndWar. This patch had some amazingly simple processes: one such was gating a metronome pulse that could play a sound file at regular (or irregular) intervals. This created the illusion of a pulse. A second notable point about the patch was pooling different variations of guitar/drum/bass riffs that could be triggered in a random order to give a more acoustically genuine performance. 



    The first person to write something with Max, Philippe D Manoury, spoke about various portions of his work and how they blended with Max. Some really interesting spectral examples where processing of live instruments were directly effected by Max and where FX were triggered by the instruments for Max to respond to. Of particular note was his string quartet, which, at points, produced bell-like sounds through the software.



    Daito Manabe, however, ruled the world when he entered and showed all the projects he’d used Max on. The audience were in hysterics on watching this and the other descriptive videos: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VtRVvBSbonk&feature=relmfu



    On reflection, my favourite things about the conference has been watching presenters patch live, thus letting us observe the thought processes and evolutions of patches as new features are imagined but I think the most amazing thing has been seeing how far this program can take projects and the infinite horizons that are available to its users.



    2 years ago
  9. 
Cycling ‘74 Expo Day 2

Day two started with a bang (puntastic): we were introduced to the brand new Gen~ object and all of its wonders. Most of which escaped me with my current level of maxspertise. Even so, the rooms atmosphere definitely emanated excitement, which I was able to physically feel. There’s science!

The education panel then kicked off with some interesting personal stories about how one goes about teaching Max/MSP to students. An amusing consensus was to start with generated music that featured some form of the string: Toggle > Metro > Random > Notein > Noteout. Much laughter. However, behind the narrative joy were some real positive messages including the diversity of Max for the teaching of many different kinds of students from those in media, games, even as far as architects. Being a Maxspert is now a cool thing!

The later presentations began with a performance from the creators of Monome: Brian Crabtree and Kelli Cain. Their perfect touch of almost sibling banter and serious passion for their product really made the presentation invite much attention. Check out Monome.org for more info.



    Cycling ‘74 Expo Day 2



    Day two started with a bang (puntastic): we were introduced to the brand new Gen~ object and all of its wonders. Most of which escaped me with my current level of maxspertise. Even so, the rooms atmosphere definitely emanated excitement, which I was able to physically feel. There’s science!



    The education panel then kicked off with some interesting personal stories about how one goes about teaching Max/MSP to students. An amusing consensus was to start with generated music that featured some form of the string: Toggle > Metro > Random > Notein > Noteout. Much laughter. However, behind the narrative joy were some real positive messages including the diversity of Max for the teaching of many different kinds of students from those in media, games, even as far as architects. Being a Maxspert is now a cool thing!



    The later presentations began with a performance from the creators of Monome: Brian Crabtree and Kelli Cain. Their perfect touch of almost sibling banter and serious passion for their product really made the presentation invite much attention. Check out Monome.org for more info.



    2 years ago
  10. 
Cycling ‘74 Expo Day 1
This weekend I’m attending the software conference of Cycling ‘74, the company that develop Max/MSP.

After an hilarious start to the day trying to navigate the NYC subway system, which hasn’t managed to maintain the elegance of the NYC street grid system, we were greeted with a T-shirt and a bi-Cycle bell and some highly needed breakfast food.

The first two hours were spent with a couple of presentations given by the CEO David Zicarelli, in which he discussed how he goes about thinking of ways to make the user interface more friendly in Max6, and Joshua C, who discussed all the cool new features with Max6!

Over lunch, Geoff M, the company’s usability issue solver (self titled as ‘the guy who makes Dave cry’) told me: “if you haven’t used curved patch chords you haven’t lived!” Although this company is extremely passionate about it’s product it did not keep us from discussing real important discover-America issues with our new found Max-Pal: My British expo’74-companion askes “where do you get a ‘Baconater’ in NYC?” 

After Lunch the presentations began with Mattijs Kneppers, a super-slick-heroic programmer who showed us all the epic patches (one with over 50000 objects) he’d been part of making. He joked about writing a little patch to count the number of objects before an audience member asked an off topic question about the program Kneppers had used to present that afternoon. Kneppers reply was to open up his ‘presentation’ patch ;)



    Cycling ‘74 Expo Day 1

    This weekend I’m attending the software conference of Cycling ‘74, the company that develop Max/MSP.



    After an hilarious start to the day trying to navigate the NYC subway system, which hasn’t managed to maintain the elegance of the NYC street grid system, we were greeted with a T-shirt and a bi-Cycle bell and some highly needed breakfast food.



    The first two hours were spent with a couple of presentations given by the CEO David Zicarelli, in which he discussed how he goes about thinking of ways to make the user interface more friendly in Max6, and Joshua C, who discussed all the cool new features with Max6!



    Over lunch, Geoff M, the company’s usability issue solver (self titled as ‘the guy who makes Dave cry’) told me: “if you haven’t used curved patch chords you haven’t lived!” Although this company is extremely passionate about it’s product it did not keep us from discussing real important discover-America issues with our new found Max-Pal: My British expo’74-companion askes “where do you get a ‘Baconater’ in NYC?” 



    After Lunch the presentations began with Mattijs Kneppers, a super-slick-heroic programmer who showed us all the epic patches (one with over 50000 objects) he’d been part of making. He joked about writing a little patch to count the number of objects before an audience member asked an off topic question about the program Kneppers had used to present that afternoon. Kneppers reply was to open up his ‘presentation’ patch ;)



    2 years ago
  11. Ok, I know I’ve been living in a cave or something since 1993 but I’ve just discovered Secret of Mana.

This music is wicked!

The music for this game was written when a CD add-on was in development for the SNES. When these plans for the add-on fell through the music was not scaled back. However, the audio processor could only accomodate 8 channels at once. Most composers at that time would only use 4 or 5 of the available 8 channels so that when sound effects were added over the top (in those remaining empty channels) no musical texture was dropped. Because the music was composed to used 7 or 8 of the available channels when sound effects are added over the top some channels of music are dropped. The music from Secret of Mana stretched the SNES system to its limit. Some contemporary classical composers like the idea of dropping lines of texture in their pieces so that when the line is brought back in again the listener will hear it in a new context and appreciate the construction even further.

Have you played this series?


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    Ok, I know I’ve been living in a cave or something since 1993 but I’ve just discovered Secret of Mana.



    This music is wicked!



    The music for this game was written when a CD add-on was in development for the SNES. When these plans for the add-on fell through the music was not scaled back. However, the audio processor could only accomodate 8 channels at once. Most composers at that time would only use 4 or 5 of the available 8 channels so that when sound effects were added over the top (in those remaining empty channels) no musical texture was dropped. Because the music was composed to used 7 or 8 of the available channels when sound effects are added over the top some channels of music are dropped. The music from Secret of Mana stretched the SNES system to its limit. Some contemporary classical composers like the idea of dropping lines of texture in their pieces so that when the line is brought back in again the listener will hear it in a new context and appreciate the construction even further.



    Have you played this series?



    3 years ago
  12. Check out all the dynamic features to the audio in this video!!!!

Although I’m not an advocate of crossfades I think the one where link enters the shop is fantastically timed! It is quite seamless, especially the fade out. 

Notice the change in the shop music when Link talks to a specific shop merchant. The tenor sax comes out of the texture. The music is here attaching a timbral signature to this particular merchant. This is fantastic use of audio and should be applauded!

I’m very much looking forward to hearing more of the Skyward sound in the weeks to come before release.

Only 8ish weeks now!

What are you guys are thinking about Skyward?

    Check out all the dynamic features to the audio in this video!!!!



    Although I’m not an advocate of crossfades I think the one where link enters the shop is fantastically timed! It is quite seamless, especially the fade out. 



    Notice the change in the shop music when Link talks to a specific shop merchant. The tenor sax comes out of the texture. The music is here attaching a timbral signature to this particular merchant. This is fantastic use of audio and should be applauded!



    I’m very much looking forward to hearing more of the Skyward sound in the weeks to come before release.



    Only 8ish weeks now!



    What are you guys are thinking about Skyward?



    3 years ago